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>> susie: a big triple-digit rally on wall street, thanks to big profits from corporate america and a breathrough in those debt talks in washington. >> tom: then, after the closing bell, apple is top banana in the company reports staggering earnings as consumers buy a record 20 million iphones. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 19. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a banner day for blue chips. the dow surged more than 200 points, its best one-day performance this year. at the close, the dow added 202 points, the nasdaq rose 61 and the s&p 500 up 21 points. then after the bell, susie, apple did it again, posting stunning earnings. >> susie: tom, we're running out of adjectives to describe the amazing growth at apple. it earned $7.79 a share in its fiscal third quarter, crushing estimates by almost $2. revenues also came in better than expected, up 82% to $28.5 billion. and that growth comes as consumers keep s
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
carry out india's worst militant attack since 2008? big dreams from a tiny island. one of the world's smallest countries hoping for olympic success. hello. it could be another landmark moment in the phone-hacking scandal. we should know very seen whether the media tycoon rupert murdoch has agreed to be questioned by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers
of winning back the house, they don't want to go there. republicans have a big flank of new members elected on a pledge of no new taxes. nobody is dealing with reality. anybody on this panel, two of us could make a deal, but they cannot. >> why can they not make a deal, charles? >> you saw it in the clip you showed. nancy pelosi is the classic definition of a reaction. liberal. no changes in programs, entitlements. -- classic definition of a reactionary at liberal. no genocide programs, entitlements. if you all make -- note changes in programs, entitlements. if you don't make changes, he will wreck the economy, and everybody over the age of nine knows that. is that they are not willing to means test -- if they are not willing to means test entitlements, which you think and liberal alike, who always argue in terms of sharing the sacrifice and the rich bearing the burden, nothing will happen. >> colby? >> you just had exhibit number one of why they have not been able to reach a deal, as my friend charles expressed. if you start out with nancy pelosi and the position of republicans on tax incr
denies any personal involvement in this but we did see a quite a bad part of strategy until the other big company was brought in. >> yes. a p.r. crisis from the beginning for news international and news corp. matthew freud does deny any involvement in it, and i think he tries to keep away from it being married to rupert murdoch's daughter. there are big global p.r. networks. so they should have an effect. >> thank you for speaking with us on that. and naomi is with us. in the next hour or so. hour and a half, we are expecting to see the prime minister who still is facing quite a difficult political hurdle on this, because questions emerged further about his links with former news international employees. >> yes. this basically comes down to a question of judgment. that's why david david cameron is under more pressure than he's come under in the last year. the question of whether he did proper checks on the former editor of the "news of the world" before he decided to hire him, and more and more people have come to light over the past couple of weeks saying they warned david cameron of the
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
not want to use a file to investigate it. >> how big a day is this today? >> it is a big day for parliament to make sure they can answer the questions. powerand get subpoena back in the committees. >> all things were joining us. -- thanks for joining us. [unintelligible] these pictures have come in the last hour or so. a public-relations company has been brought into news corp. is helping murdock prepare for this. it seems to have changed their approach. from rupert murdoch said there were only minor problems and told this to american news -- newspapers. but in britain, he apologized to the british public for the hacking scandal. the real question is what will be amended in a select committee today on questions on whether or not there was a cover-up. this has shaken many of the foundations of the british political scale. >> four decades, -- for decades, rupert murdoch has towered over britain's. but what will remain of him? has this shifted the balance between politicians and media in britain? >> the relationship became too close. we all want the support of newspaper groups and broadcasting
the markets. >> europe's leaders know they have to get over big political differences if the greek problem is to be solved. >> leaders have to raise above their domestic political agenda, and they will. proposals of the euro group on measures that will risk contagion in your area are you are intelligently needed. >> the fact they are still talking about proposals is surely alarming. this crisis is 18 months old now and investors may be losing patience. matthew price, "bbc news," brussels. >> feels like everyone is losing patience. the ireland situation, junk bond status according to moody. >> yes. the credit rating is now down junk status and by doing these cuts, moody's is doing -- showing that they need to agree and bring in a proper fix for this debt crisis, but it also raise this is discrepancy among the rating agencies. stacey dugard and fitch have ireland raised three notches above jupping status and moody's not only did they downgrade them to junk status but said there could be further doubts come. but the problem for poor ireland, they'll likely be forced to get rid of those bonds,
points of a plan-- no details. but what we can probably gather from this plan-- it has big tax increases in it and all the spending cuts will happen in the out years. well, how many times do politicians think they can pull that one over on the american people? >> reporter: the split among republicans made it difficult for party leaders to determine just what might pass the house. whatever it turns out to be, it still must be acceptable to senate democrats and ultimately to the president. this morning, the senate's majority leader democrat harry reid challenged house speaker john boehner to take matters in hand. >> right now, i'm at a point where we need to hear from the house of representatives. we've planned to go forward over here, but until we hear from the house all our work is for naught. i await word from the speaker. >> reporter: in the meantime, there's general agreement that translating the complex gang of six plan into legislation and votes before august second, is likely unrealistic. that could put the short-term emphasis back on a senate backup plan to let the president raise
a big jobs generator, the place they call the space coast. but in particular today i spent some time talking with travis thompson who has spent 33 years here at the kennedy space center working on the shuttle program. he is the lead technician on the clogout crew, the guys who button them up, the astronauts, strap them in, shut the door and send them off to space. he and his team, it was a very emotional day for them. as they were finishing up their job they had put together a series of cards with messages talking about their appreciation for the program, their patted rotism and frankly -- patriotism and their sadness, and the final word was god bless america, held by travis thompson himself. this is travis thompson's last day on the job, after 100 shuttle missions, getting the crews strapped in and ready to go to space, tomorrow he has no job. where he is going to go to work. as he said, my job is putting human beings in spacecraft to go to space. i don't see a lot of prospects for doing that somewhere else. so it is a poignant moment for him. >> so finally, miles, look back with us
exposure to italian paper. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calme
to the business, it's search! >> tom: corporate earnings season heats up with big numbers from google and a healthy quarter from j.p. morgan. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, july 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. almost $7 billion in sales equals another blockbuster quarter for google, a blowout beginning to earnings for technology companies. susie, internet search and search advertising continue driving the big profits at the web giant. >> susie: tom, google's earnings surged almost 40% and google stock soared as well, up over $60 or 12% after the closing bell. google earned $8.74 a share in the second quarter, about $1 more than analyst estimates. google continued its hiring blitz, adding 2,400 employees during the quarter. paid clicks, or the number of times internet users clicked on the company's ads, rose 18%, in line w
. but it remains to be seen whether there will be a big enough reduction in great that for that to happen, and whether they have managed to build a fire wall around greece. >> do you think this deal is just another sticking plaster? >> i think it will be difficult for this deal completely to save greece. it is not clear, because we are not seeing all the details. the reduction in debt that private debt holders are expected to take is not that big. it is a reduction of 20% in the net present value. unless the official debt is good to come in with gigantic amounts of money -- greece is going to still have a giant debt burden. it is difficult because the greek growth rate is not high and the government has trouble collecting taxes. unless greece suddenly becomes much more productive and competitive, it is likely they will have to come back and do another debt reduction further down . >> is this bailout ultimately political by leaders who want to save the eurozone, red and economic? >> when it comes to saving the eurozone, the two are intertwined. you could be more cynical and say it is to do
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
. this is big for facebook. i do not know it is revolutionary for the user. >> all the people using facebook -- i understand a lot of people are deciding they do not want to use facebook. do they want to have a chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of their work scenario. >> with this audience, with any audience, this kind of video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions. if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot do a video chat with you while i am on the bus going to work. that is complicated. i can always do a text chat. this is a rich interface for a minority of your communications. but facebook once those to happen within facebook, and not have you leave to use your skype program. >> i think i understand the technical side of this. one thing that seems to be clear from the business side is it comes in the same week that google announced its social network. it is trying to take on facebook as well. who is winning that battle? >> it depends how you measure it. on sheer numbers, n
.k. version of some big names. it's important to note the u.k. newspaper part of the empire only represents 4% of group sales. but if you look, for example, at the cost of news of the world, the profits they contribute and the weekday paper, the sun, it's about $138 million. for a global empire that makes hand in earnings about $3 billion a year, they can probably handle a loss in advertising revenue and readers. but they've also got the possible conference ensation coming up from the alleged victims of the phone hacking. sienna miller's phone was hacked and received a settlement of $160,000 u.s. dollars. if you multiply that times alleged victims, $32 million is what it comes closer to. we'll have a look at the european central bank. likely to go up with interest rates today. more on that coming up. >> state media in china dismiss reports a head has tied. culminating reports that said he was dead. from beijing is our correspondent. martin, what has been fueling all this speculation? >> well, these rumors started last week because he failed to show up to the celebration marking china's commun
sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insurgent groups that are willing to talk about this option. they have been fighting for three decades in afghanistan. people are tired. i think right now what we're seeing is some elements willing, some elements unwilling. based on the fact that many of them believe they are winning right now, that the u.s. and other allies are leaving, i think it is unlikely that they will cut a deal now. not wait it out -- why not wait it out? >> to what extent is the taliban looking at things like this letter-signing, seeing
in the future. >> susie: let's talk a little. we were talking to a big institutional shareholder who is very concern body the outlook for this stock. would you buy news corp at $16. is this an opportunity for investors, or is it too risky? >> near term with the $5 billion share buy back that mr. murdoch announced tuesday that begins on august 5th, i think near term, it's probably a buy at news corp, but long term, you have to wait until the dust settles. there's too much uncertainty, and potential liability that the company and senior managers are facing. that want to invest long term. >> susie: there was an article in "newsweek" written by carl bernstein under the title, murdoch's watergate and saying that this is the beginning of the end of the murdoch empire. your thoughts on that. could that be the case? >> i don't think the empire is going to crumble any time soon. but what i think we are seing is perhaps an end to the celebrity type cuture ta inculcated journalism on both sides of the atlantic and has been mainly stimulateed and driven by the murdoch approach to get the news at any cos
for republicans. >> well, i think the big stumbling block right now is the president's insistence on raising taxes. and i think we need to go back two years ago in 2009 when president obama was asked in indiana do you raise tacks during a recession. and he very eloquently i think answered the question. and he said no, don't do that. and he laid out the economic reasons for not doing that. now look, this economy is begging for mercy. we're at 9.2% unemployment. an i think it's time to move off of this notion that somehow the remedy is to increase taxes on job creators. let's focus in on these cuts. let's make thoughtful and wise cuts and let's come together on this in a fashion that makes sense all the way around. >> ifill: listening to both sides of this debate it seems one man's taxes are another man's revenue increases and it's a question of whether you are talking about raising net taxes or not -- or increasing revenues at all. you could imagine that the average viewer trying to make sense of this doesn't know which definition you are talking about. >> here's the definition i think that should
of thing. >> yes, she made a big point in the hearings this afternoon saying she hadn'tbeen to downing street while david cameron was prime minister and contrasted it with the fac she'd been there a l under gordon brown and tony blair and the reason she hasn't been to downing street is she doesn't have to. they see each other ithe country side in the little village and easier to meethere an gng to downing street and have it in the papers. >> the solution to bad journalism has been more journalism and government has been far and ay bystanders and i don't think the committee hearing did a lot to change that. i think the lines of inquiry will continue to advance will come from the guardian and new york times and will come from the wall street journal and probably not from the mps of parliament. >> charlie: but including the wall street journal. >> wall street journal i thought was hilarious the other day saying there's an editorial saying you're all doing overkill there's so much and all hard-hitting. you have a $40 billion company to close a 168-year-old newspaper and ten people arrested
such a big hit already, it probably won't make that much difference to the public standing, the public in which they find themselves. >> so what do you think really was the overriding factor here? is it a moral decision, media decision, or business decision? >> well, it's obviously a business decision, clearly. but i think other things come into it, and we don't know, we can't be party to the discussions and internal investigations that have gone on. she was editor of "news of the world" during the period in which some of the worst examples of hacking, the hacking into milly dowler, the 7/7 bomb victims' phones, and in view of that, that revelation itself should have led to her resignation. it's possible she's resigned a couple of times, it's been rejected, and finally, perhaps on the third occasion, murdoch and his advisors decided, ok, fair enough, it's time she went. >> it's strange, though, isn't it? just a few days ago, speaking to "news of the world" journalists, she said they would understand why the newspaper had to close, because she was privy to information that was going to
have had their phones tapped into. there's a big police investigation going on at the moment. the police, themselves, are under a lot of pressure because politically if they were the ones that said it was just a few isolated incidents. the reason why it's really explosive is because originally the executives at the news of the world claimed that it was just a few bad apples at the newspaper, just a few rogue reporters. now that defense has been unraveling for the last few months. that means people like rebekah brooks, the uk team executive of news corp., she is now right in the firing line because people want to know what she knew about it. >> we will leave it there. thank you very much. aid agencies are warning that people's lives are risk if east africa faces what is being described as its worst drought in decades, possibly a up to six years. and million people in the horn of africa are expected to have food shortages. tens of thousands of been on the move seeking aid in rescue decamped in kenya. one of those agencies has said this is a preventable disaster. i asked the u.n
not a big part of the investor focus until last week. >> one group has accused rupert murdoch of treating the company like a family candy jar. do you think there could be growing unease among investors? >> for context, these are relatively small institutional investors. they have added this to their libby of complaints. we are picking up concern about corporate governance. -- this has added to their litany of complaints. this sense that they failed to get a grip on the scandal has been running for so long, this is quite concerning to investors not just in terms of legal exposure but why was management not able to handle this better? that is changing people's appraisal of potential succession to mr. murdoch and the families' chances of appointing their own chosen successor. this is a company controlled by mr. murdoch and his family. >> if he was to sell or close to u.k. newspapers, would that help the overall business? would that isolate the problem, do you think? >> this is an idea was pitched to news corp. before the scandal because newspapers are slower growing that fox news, the chain
-- >> what are you suggesting? >> exactly what you think. >> paul tsongas had cancer. there was a big difference between cancer and migraines. if we are going to hold up a standard that if you have a headache that knocks you out for an hour or two, you cannot be president, fdr and kennedy, who had addison's disease, and eisenhower, who had a bad heart, would never have been president of the united states. i am not sure that is the position any of us would want to take. i think her answer was good, i think based on the evidence -- is their behavioral evidence of this woman not being able -- >> just be a cautionary. >> well, cautionary is fine -- >> i don't know the capitol hill physicians but i don't think it is fair to imply that somehow this is a less qualified individual. >> i'm not saying that. >> what about rick perry? >> rick . looks more and more like he is going to come into the race. -- rick perry looks more and more like he is going to come into the race. mike huckabee, a conservative finalist in 2008 against john mccain, has taken a shot at him, saying he will be the champio
that that is a big if at this point but there are a lot of questions. i think the employees at news corp. media properties are nervous, shareholders are nervous. there are questions about what this means for the future of the company. a lot of questions i am hearing is where is the push stock -- the push back on rupert murdoch? shareholders have said this is like a family business, this is a public business. there needs to be strong vertex in place to make sure whether it is an independent board of directors, someone comes in and challenges rupert murdoch on some of these issues going forward. -- there needs to be some strong checks in place. i think that investors want to see that. >> thank you for joining us. president obama said that negotiations over the debt ceiling have reached the 11th hour. in a statement, he praised a new proposal that would cut 4 trillion dollars in the debt over 10 years through a mix of tax increases and spending cuts. israeli forces have stopped a french-flagged boat going toward the gaza strip in an attempt to break the blockade. the boat has now been taken to an
disaffected members of his own party. there's no big mechanism, no easy mechanism for ousting him. so andy has e advantage of the holiday. all of this will have time to cooldown. ed milleband, he's right, he's made good progress, but the polls show that although there's been a kind of windy-danging to the tories, the labor has not picked up. the lib-dems, doing badly until now, have gained a little bit. people are not convinced by milleband. i think the relations between the parties remain pretty much unchanged, but ihink these problems have not gone away for cameron, they've just gone io the slightly longer grass, because the police now have until the fall to decide, for example, whether to lay charges. sohat could happen is that all of this could come back with a vengeance around the time of the annual party conferences. >> let's just break this into parts, charlie. the first , david cameron's short-term problem. and that is this question that his error of judgment in hiring mr. coulson. now, until this affair really broke, you could argue that david cameron led the strongest government in w
on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the firestorm over phone hacking in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the p
of pressure on a country's finances. it is a big worry indeed. of course, it is connected -- it is the mother of all contagions, it's connected to greece because the whole package to try to rescue greece has been delayed and delayed, and that is poisoning investors' confidence. but i'll have a lot more on the world business report in about 20 minutes' time. >> thanks very much. the bbc has learned that britain's culture secretary is writing to regulators for further advice on the implications of newscorp's planned bid for the broadcaster, bskyb. it comes in the wake of the "news of the world" phone hacking scandal o. sunday, rupert murdoch flew to london to guide the company through the crisis. >> it was all smiles as rebekah brooks and rupert murdoch left a restaurant last night. by allowing media access like this, news corporation is keen to convey a message that it's all business as usual. rebekah brooks stopped to help a photographer who fell over in the melee. it's understood she could soon be interviewed by police as a witness, though she says she knew nothing about phone hacking when s
's and suffers a lot of pain. getting his pain treated properly has made a big difference to both of them. >> his mood would change so quickly. never knew how he was going to be from -- not from day to day, but hour to hour. >> at this home they worked very hard to try to find alternatives to treating patients with antipsychotic drugs. today's story is prompting experts for doctors everywhere to speak much more carefully about whether so-called painkillers can be a better solution instead. jane hughes, bbc news. >> now in haiti it's been a year and a half since a devastating earth quake droyed the capital. 70,000 still live in camps and many face a daily struggle for survival. dr. paul farm are tells the story in his book "tatey after the earthquake." for decades he's worked to help the people from the island nation and recently discussed me to discuss their plight. doctor, thank you very much for joining us. you have been a champion for haiti for many years, long before the earthquake happened. and you described in your latest book the resilience and the suffering of the people there. what's the
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
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